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Capture The Flag(staff) – 31 Days Of Geocaching

The day 10 souvenir icon is a lamppost…and I did ponder going after a typical lamppost skirt cache (not that we actually have any active ones in Dunedin) but it was such a great day here I decided to take the boys on a cache trek…

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The Flagstaff Hill is a bit of an icon here in Dunedin. There is quick access from the city, amazing views and a feeling of being away from it all. It’s also a very social experience with lots of other people walking dogs, running or just enjoying the space.

Jedi Theo, Jedi Master Zach, Toby and I set out to find a couple of excellent Daywalk caches  GC3QXN4 Road Crossing and GC3QXNE Where Bullocks Passed. These caches have a wonderful history behind them and this is outlined in the lengthy cache listings.

From the Road Crossing listing:

You thought you were walking up the Flagstaff walkway, didn’t you? You are – except for the 20 metre wide strip here which has been dedicated as a public road since Dunedin was first settled 150-odd years ago.

It’s Otago’s first road, running from Halfway Bush via Flagstaff, Swampy, Hightop and Jones Hill to GC1ZPCG">Orbells Crossing by Cherry Farm….

A cache in the middle of the main road to Waikouaiti? Sounds dangerous! But there’s no need for concern. Just put in the coordinates of the cache hide on the WAMS site (eg use the NZTM 2000 Position Format E1,403,011 N4,921,306). You’ll see that the cache is safely placed on the side of the road where it won’t be trampled by traffic going down Spiers Rd to GC24348">Ben Rudds I and GC37Z5X">The Black Box.

And from Where Bullocks Passed:

Come and see where bullocks once passed on Flagstaff. You’ll find a 1.2 litre snaplock deposited in the deep 19th century bullock cart ruts on Otago’s first road between Dunedin and Waikouaiti.
For the first 15 years of Dunedin’s existence, this bush-free “Mountain Track” was the only road north. It was particularly important as the stock route by which Johnny Jones supplied the early settlers with food from his farms at Cherry Farm and Matanaka. Travellers wanting to use the road would often wait for one of Johnny Jones’ frequent trips to take advantage of his guidance. In 1857 David Hutcheson began carrying mails north by the mountain track in a fortnightly service, using a horse and packhorse, being paid £200 a year.

William Cutten wrote in 1852 that the track “over the mountains … is a very pleasant ride in fine warm weather”. However, it was lonely and if the mist rolled in (as it often did – and still does) the journey might prove dangerous. Many people lost their way. The Rev. John Christie wrote in 1880 of several skeletons which had been found along the route (see excerpt as log note below).

Did you capture a cache on the 10th day? Tell us about it in the comments below. 

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