Farewell Moneydork: A Tribute To Caching In Top Gear

 

Categories: Moneydork/Camocrab New Zealand NZ Recreational GPS Society

 

It’s Not About The Numbers honours a departing geocacher who truly is world famous in New Zealand.

Some say he knows of new caches three years before they are listed. Others suggest that his delicate wee ankles are a sign he is descended from elves. All we know is that he’s called:

Camocrab … or Moneydork … or Wayne.

Whichever handle you know him by, Wayne Champion has been a major player in New Zealand’s geocaching scene for many years.

As Moneydork, he has fended off constant challenges from all-comers – including the forces of nature – to establish himself as one of the country’s most prolific cachers. As Camocrab, volunteer reviewer for Geocaching.com, he has examined and evaluated New Zealand cache listings since 2006.  As Wayne, he has been involved in the recovery efforts for both the Christchurch earthquakes and the Pike River coalmine tragedy.

But now Wayne has been called to the ‘West’ island (also known as Australia) to run Whyalla, Eastern Eyre and Far North Health Services for the South Australian Government – though It’s Not About The Numbers has heard a rumour the real reason for this shift is that he’s run out of New Zealand caches to find.

As you’d expect, a man with so many roles also has quite a number of stories to go along with them …

Like the time he undertook a caching trip throughout Otago and Southland in his CRV, whose brakes were getting just a little, er, squeaky. As he pulled out of Oamaru after lunch, a clunk on the road alerted those in the car that what little remained of the brakes on one wheel had completely fallen off.

ImageAnd while we’re talking about cars, put your hand up if you haven’t heard the story about GCNMD4 Yellow Submarine. That’s the one where Moneydork assured Bitsprayer that he could drive down to the cache by crossing a tidal flat. Unfortunately, they couldn’t drive back. Still, there was plenty to occupy the pair over the next few hours, as they watched the car – stuck mere metres from solid ground – become covered by the incoming sea.

After these, and a few other interesting encounters, we’re told Moneydork finally saw the value in getting his own AA membership.

Those who have cached with Moneydork report that his talent for finding geocaches is primarily due to some unique searching methods. Apparently, the hunt for an ammo can hidden in tussock grass is sped up dramatically after he hurls himself on it.

Perhaps it is this do-or-die attitude that has made him such a successful geocacher. Not only is Moneydork top of the New Zealand leaderboard, he has also been an Australasian record holder for ‘most finds in a day’ (December 2007).

In an odd parallel with his vehicular mishaps, this title was an accidental achievement. Having copped a bit of gentle ribbing from the then record holders while on holiday in Tasmania, Wayne and good friend Rediguana couldn’t resist caching until 7am the following morning so they could claim the glory for themselves. More impressively, the Kiwi duo even found time to attend a geocaching event – where they sat down for a meal and a beer with the locals.

More than one cacher we spoke to mentioned how difficult it was to keep up with Moneydork, whose caching stamina appears limitless!

Another accident (seeing a theme here yet?) whilst caching last year put Wayne, the general manager of West Coast District Health Board, at the mercy of his own staff. Surgery on his shoulder required a “little sleepover at work” and a few months of limited caching. This experience led him to comment on how much he had learnt about his own hospital from the other patients and how the bulk of the recovery process occurred after their discharge.

Perhaps the most enlightening comment we received about him, though, was: “For those that pursue the numbers it can very readily turn into a chore in simply caching to stay ahead but I don’t think that is the case for Wayne, every find is a challenge, and is fun for him. There is a very big little boy inside him, and it is delightful to see.”

And let’s not forget that Moneydork has been a longstanding member of the New Zealand Recerational GPS Society. In recent times, he has also been its president and one of the main drivers of the country’s first MEGA event – to be held in Dunedin next October (Have YOU registered your interest for this geo-extravaganza yet!?!).

Before we evict Wayne from these fine shores, we’d like to say a huge  thanks for all his years of service to New Zealand’s geo-community (from which we will continue to benefit for some time yet, thanks to the MEGA). Good luck with your upcoming adventure in Oz. You’re sure to have a blast there, though we fully expect to see you back when you’ve run out of caches.

So that’s the naked truth about a man who’s played such a vital role in New Zealand caching. Our loss is Australia’s gain but we can’t honestly say we’re all that sad to see the back of him – especially with his penance for caching in his birthday suit across the ditch!

Where’s Wayne?

Those wanting to farewell Wayne in person can do so at the Streewth Cobba, Moneydork’s Leaving! event (GC35E39) in Greymouth on Thursday, November 10. You’ll also find him manning the GPS Society’s geocaching stall at the Edgar Centre Have a Go day in Dunedin on Sunday, November 13.

Hat Tip: Thanks to all the Kiwi cachers who contributed stories for this tribute post. For your own safety, we will make sure you stay anonymous!

 

 
 



 

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  1. rediguana says:

    November 5, 2011 at 12:00 am

    Slight corrections. The 195 in Adelaide in 2007 certainly wasn’t accidental! The Tasmanian record was provoked and included the event and the 7am finish (followed by a flight to Melbourne and another days caching). The Northern Territory record was ‘accidental’.

    for Wayne, every find is a challenge

    Mwahahahaha. Remedial caching for Wayne! 🙂

  2. Pete says:

    November 5, 2011 at 10:06 am

    A fitting tribute to a fine specimen. Although I’m not sure I needed to see that last photo. CAN NOT UNSEE!!!!

    With the frequency he visited the West Island, I suspect we haven’t seen the last of him quite yet.

    All the best Wayne – give’em hell.

  3. Moneydork says:

    November 6, 2011 at 8:18 pm

    Oh dear!
    I should also add that I’m not certain whether I’ll get to the Edgar Centre have a go day in Dunedin on the 13th. It was mooted and planned before I accepted the job offer from South Australia, but is starting to look logistically difficult.

    Regards,
    Wayne.

  4. Geocachers says:

    November 8, 2011 at 12:56 pm

    Looks like some good geocaching to be had in your area. We just started a YouTube based show about geocaching you can check out at geocachersnyc.com. Hope you enjoy.

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